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supplied to the economy by the fed and the stock market has had a lot of the crazy stock is replaced by a larger bubble in the real estate in which we expanded this economy based on all of the false rules while people were spending money that they don't have come in and we have a lot of consumption and employment that was a function of the wealth. that bubble burst and now all of the achieved money that the fed was creating was going into the government through the bond market. the government was able to borrow enormous amounts of money and all true low interest rates thanks to the fed coming and now we have an economy that is dependent on all of this excess government spending in the cheap money and you can see it in the price of the bond but like the two prior bubbles it is going to burst and unfortunately what it does, the consequences for the economy are going to be much worse than they were when either the real estate bubble burst or the stock market bubble. >> and again, the 21st, the so-called private sector baubles, what was the federal government role in your view in creatin
the problems facing the u.s. economy for about an hour and 45 minutes. next on book tv. [applause] >> thanks to the fashion institute of technology. unquestionably the most in the world today. [applause] in addition to being nobel laureates i would have to say from the vantage point for the economic thinking those would be my finalists. [applause] as you know, we've written a book that pertains to the challenges and circumstance the price of an equality. on behalf of them i thank you for your patronage and. let's start with paul. paul, you talked about and this depression now. a lot of people don't believe we could end this now. but agency deutsch human beings have to take on this challenge? something that is recognizably the same kind of animal. we victimize it is the same technology still there and skills are still there. look back to the 1930's and there are a lot of people making the argument that there were no easy answers and you could quickly get out of this [inaudible] and the 1939 and these are fundamental problems and if we want to make progress to cut unemployment benefits and thi
of the excheck kerr. >> mr. speaker, it's taking time, but the british economy is healing. [laughter] after the biggest financial crash of our lifetime, people know that we face each problem at home and abroad. at home we live with the decades of debt and the failure to equip britain to compete in the modern world. and we face a multitude of problems from abroad. the u.s. fiscal cliff, the slowing growth in china, above all the eurozone now in recession. people know that there are no quick fixes to these problems, but they want to know that we are making progress, and the message from today's autumn statement is that we are making progress. it is a hard road, but we're getting there, and britain is on the right track. >> will the chancellor resume his seat. now, look, let's be clear about this. the house knows well enough by now that i will afford a very full opportunity for questioning of the chancellor. but the more interruption, the greater the noise, the longer the session will take, and that cannot be right. so i appeal to members, please, to give the chancellor a courteous hearing as,
can count on. ♪ could push the u.s. economy behind the times. plus, a preview of what stocks investors are looking to own after ringing in the new year. the sudden flow of one hundred dollar bills is indicating a rise in fishy activity. and, bring on the breakout. are the markets poised for a swing to the upside? first business starts now. you're watching first business: financial news, analysis, and today's investment ideas. good morning. it's wednesday, december 5th. i'm angela miles. in today's first look: standstill. that's what's happening with the budget talks in washington, and it's reflected on wall street. stocks barely budged yesterday. gold, however, was a major mover. what that tells traders is coming up in the show. pandora hit a sour note with investors last night. shares plunged after the company revealed a loss of advertising money as lawmakers fail to find harmony over averting the fiscal cliff. the brand new dreamliner is under review after making an emergency landing in new orleans due to a mechanical glitch. larry shover of sfg alternatives joins us now on this wedn
a better economy and that reduces the debt. >> there is a headline predicting we will be producing more oil than saudi arabia beginning in 2020. this is something almost on imagined 10 years ago. -- unimagined 10 years ago. what is the role of the federal government? >> to do things that encouraged the results. to follow up on the fiscal cliff. you can solve this fiscal problem if you grow our role to position relative to everybody else's. a big problem is the percentage of government spending is more than its should be related to total gdp. if there is an easier for millet in the history of economics that -- formula ever in the history of america -- economics that more american energy equals more american jobs, i don't know what it is. it is all the jobs you have if you of a reliable supply of energy. the front page of the "the wall street journal" indicates a difficulty of connecting this cheap product we have in natural gas. we thought we would run out natural-gas as a country. connecting this cheap product with a more expensive market and getting it overseas. if we could become energy s
together but clearly the asian economies are thriving and growing faster and their version of capitalism which is a much bigger role for government, which has government playing more of a straw role in picking winners and losers, determining who gets educator and how they get educated, those forms of capitalism seem to be gaining the upper hand in the global debate and we have to recognize if we don't address the flaws in our own system like the flaws associated with any college or the inability to create jobs for the free rein given to big investors at the expense of everybody else we are going to lose our influence, the model is going to change and we're going to be at a disadvantage. >> host: what is china doing right? >> guest: they are growing fast. by 2030, china is the second-biggest economy in the world right now. we think of it as an exporting economy but their growth has been internal. by 23 which is not that long way although it sounds far away, they will be the world's largest consumer economy. they will be the ones setting the trend in terms of one car is like and what a was
because the underlying fundamentals in the u.s. economy are clearly improving, and you also have a stabilization or soft landing happening in china at the same time. >> david kelly, what do you want to be doing here? what's your strategy for the fiscal cliff? do you think we go over it, and what do you want to do? >> for a long-term investor, you don't try and play this one. i agree with stephanie about the market probably going higher once they get a resolution. they will get a resolution. it's possible it could go into early january. i still think they're more likely to get a resolution done before the end of the year. either way, they'll get a resolution done. when that happens, then we'll resort to looking at the u.s. economy, which is strengthening a bit here. also, the extreme and relative valuations between high-quality fixed income and equities will push money towards equities. i would not run for cover here because of the volatility. i think you just have to, you know, hold your ground through this and hope that the market moves higher next year. >> bob, this activity at
on the wealthiest individuals and the economy grew at its fastest rate in a generation. it added more than 22 million jobs. during the following eight years, the top marginal rate dax tax rate was lower, but economy never regained its strength from the reviews decade. middle-class families are vulnerable when the recession began at the end of 2007. i hope this hearing is helpful not just in this hearing, but across this country to people who are watching and waiting for congress to act. i will say more at the end about some of our members who are leaving. it is -- it has been an honor for me to serve as chairman of this committee and also served with my friend, kevin brady, as vice chair. he has been great to work with. i hope there'll be bipartisan success in congress. i look forward to working with him as i change seats in the senate for the next congress. i am grateful to our witnesses, whom i will introduce. before i do that, opening statements. >> i think the chairman for the recognition. this is the concluding hearing from the 112th congress. ,'m behalf of the vice chair kevin brady, on
with the german economy and this is a big divergence. so that's a change. but looking over time, all stocks have the component of what they call the economic return. speculative return which is it for change and the valuation that the market puts on it. over time, one is a possum gain and the other is zero sum gain. sometimes good news, sometimes bad news. but over time the kind of net being nothing. >> we'll see what happens. good to have you on. we'll be out in westminster, joined by the british shadow business secretarier to. we'll talk currencies. find out why one strategist is bullish on the currency. after the ramp up in m&a that we've seen this year, we'll also speak to an expert in los angeles that says the fundamentalses for deal activity in 2013 are looking more solid. so where will the money flow in the new year, that's at 11:20. and the outlook for u.s. credit market appears less rose city. we'll speak to a moody's analyst that says high duration credit could be badly exposed. the european central bank is announcing either monetary policy decisions later today. economists expect ecb
to focus on this major threat to the economy. i wish others had. it would have given us more time to fix this major problem. at least now there's a focus on one thing and one dangerous man. a man who is not elected. who has never run pour office and is standing in the way after potential economic disaster. he's the ideological godfather of the tea party. grover norquist has been the driving force behind the anti-tax movement. his goal, to take big government and, in his words, drown it in the bathtub. norquist's weapon is the taxpayer protection pledge, which was at one point signed by 95% of gop members of congress. >> can you raise your hand if you feel so strongly about not raising taxes? >> on the campaign trail this year, only one republican presidential candidate, jon huntsman, dared to cross him. norquist has clout. he's called the most powerful unelected man in america today. >> he signed a pledge, it's without congress. >> that pledge is for that congress. >> i'm not obligated on the pledge. >> republicans are jumping ship and supporting unspecified r revenue hikes to help cut t
the economy avoid the cliff and rides above? anyway, senior u.s. economist and managing director at ubs. do you think we'll get a deal? >> i think we'll get a deal. do we get it before the holidays or after for markets, it matters. it's been a drag for the last nine months. so the idea that there is more uncertainty now than there was six months ago, how does that work? there was no fiscal cliff deal six months from now and still no deal. so i'm not sure why we think there's more uncertainty. i would say if you really think about it the president has a lot of ways to delay the impact. for example, our withholding table don't have to get change order january 1. even if you haven't struck a deal, you don't adjust the withholding tables. for now you can delay the pain. so there is wiggle room in terms of when the impact has to be felt. >> but is there where wiggle rom the investing world who looks at the united states and says these guys are a bunch of keystone cops. this cost us with the last round of negotiations back in the summer of 2011 when the debt rating agencies said if you can't find
that marie solving insolvent firms easier. crucial agreement for restructuring the economy in this transition period as resources must shift from unproductive to productive activities. it is the latter that create jobs. this reallocation process, though sometimes painful in the short run, i'll say always painful in the short run, carries the seed of future prosperity. a growing body of knowledge shows that by increasing the ability of the economy to adjust so that factors can be reallocated to the most competitive firms, aggregate labor productivity can increase substantially. some studies indicate a gain of as much as 20 force 30%. the current focus on competitiveness in france leading towards an institutional and fiscal set up that can support firms investment in innovation is therefore a welcome step in the right direction. another important aspect is the growth and competitiveness enhancing potential of further market integration in europe. one example is a very recent study which finds that applying the eu patent would raise the gains for european firms from patent and inventions by 60%.
this one and that is good for the american economy. >> we look back republican senator rand paul from the state of kentucky. senator paul, welcome, as always. i want to ask you about the fiscal cliff, the state of play. there's revenues on the table. there's tax rate increases on the table. i don't know if there's spending on the table. what's your thinking prigt now? >> that it's a really, really bad idea to raise taxes. if you want your economy to grow, you should do the opposite. we have to cut taxes. that's how i'd fix the economy. leave more money in the private sector. the president is adamant about raising taxes and he's dead wrong. >> there are some people saying we need a deal to avoid a huge tax increase but year end that would throw us into recession. just a thought, would you compromise in terms of let's say a smaller tax rate increase -- let's say the top rate goes to 37% instead of 40%, maybe the threshold goads es to $500,000 $750,000 rather than $250,000? does that interest you? >> no. but what about means testing for entitlement. why don't we say the rich get less soc
the economy in the process. that would be a good start, as a backdrop. i want to touch on your question about corporate and individual taxes. the third piece is small businesses. we work out how develop a tax code that is good for competitiveness. you need to think about how those play into it. i think one of the things to keep hearing through messages with different groups of people is, while everybody is aware that the solution is going to take sacrifices from all sides, on spending, on revenues -- the confidence you get for putting the deal in place to actually has tremendous economic benefits. the cheapest form of stimulus is confidence. if we can put that in place, and people believe something is going to stick, it becomes easier to do your part in all of this. if the moving pieces and revenue are there, do not underestimate the benefit of what the future holds. >> this ties into michael's point. the productivity, the amount of money they get spent maintaining and administering the complex tax code is unbelievable. i would rather be spending that money. let us get on with building a busi
revive the american economy if people are expected to take, they've already had 25% pay cut in six years. that's not the american dream and that's not the way you make an economy work. they're way and you have whack. >> you raised the issue of germany. many point to it's robust economy and manufacturing sector who would resist here worker representationen oh the board of directors. how has the actual representation impacted labor strife over in europe, for example? >> you know, there is some strife, but i think there is also more of a sense that we're all in this together. as you point out i mentioned germany, but it's, you know, france all the way through the nordic countries. the other thing that's key is in a newly emerging democracy like brazil the workers through collective bargaining is four to five times the level of the united states. you have rising wages millions of brazilian workers coming into middle income status, able to buy the things they produce and a growing economy in brazil. here, the micro system of each employer trying to maximize profits at the expense of employees
and the demand for oil -- actually, and the demand for oil continues to decline based on fuel economy standards and other reasons. and yet, with this revolution we still continue to have a problem. and i think the report that we're releasing today, the national strategy for energy security and its subtitle really says it all -- harnessing american resources innovation. and the first point is, how do we leverage this abundance we have in the united states to our maximum benefit? at a time when washington is talking about our fiscal crisis i'd say that the relationship of our oil needs to this crisis itself are close. it might not solve our fiscal crisis but clearly it's a necessary ingredient. every recession in the history of the united states in moden times has been preceded by or happening concurrent with an oil price spike. if we don't have continued growth we can cut all we want and raise revenue all we want, but we'll never find a way to solve our fiscal troubles. and i think this report really looks at how do we leverage this great abundance, this great blessing in the united states, both
think the ramifications for the economy are too significant. i think we're watching whatever you want to call it, all of the politics playing out, but i still think in the end we'll get a last minute deal. >> i agree. and i think even though the sides are far apart, you have things on the table now. so you can say you're here at 800, 1.6, you kind of -- it gets you somewhere close. somebody will try to say 1.3 versus 1.1, but if you see publicly what they're stating and hopefully privately other things are going on, but it will get done, but it will be very slow. >> john boehner with the proposal he put on the table, i did see commentary from some of the far right saying this is not an acceptable proposal. even his proposal is not acceptable. i did see comment it ter that came through. my question is does the president now have to alienate some of his far left base in order to reach a compromise. >> i think you'll see both of them have to actually bring the parties together. because you won't get everybody happy. some of the people who got voted on the ticket side, no, never. but it w
to get better. the economy is strong. it's going to get stronger. >> what evidence do you have these guys are not just going to go over the fiscal cliff? we heard tim geithner on this program yesterday when steve asked him, look f you don't get what you want, do we go over the fiscal cliff? he said absolutely. >> he said he would do it! >> what happens when we wake up january nd, we go over the cliff, and the world doesn't end? >> that is so irresponsible. >> you have to be a long-term investor. long-term stocks have outperformed bonds. >> with all do respect, george, are you one of those come play september investors larry is referring to? >> i'd say we're opposite of that. we never take anything for granted, but we bet accordingac. bonds are trouble. a lot of people are going to lose a lot of money in bonds. you have to be prepared for that. interest rates are going to go up. dividends are going to continue to increase. the economy in this country is strong. it's going to get stronger. >> even at 44% dividend tax? >> it's not going to go that high. >> if we go over the fiscal cliff, it
that there may be some more demand coming for the metal from china and the u.s. as well. as both of our economies begin to churn a little more than expected. the top two copper-consuming countries. >> and following auto sales today, a number of derivatives plays hitting 52-week highs. cooper tire and rubber, genuine parts and carmax taking a hit in today's session. david: all right. and we told you about that breaking news on jpmorgan whale trader, a $5 billion loss for the company. the senate has been investigating. peter barnes with the latest on that investigation. peter? >> reporter: well, that's right, david. the senate, a senate investigation subcommittee has questioned more than 80 people in its probe of $5.8 billion in trading losses in may by jpmorgan chase, the london whale trading losses, according to two people familiar with the investigation. now, according to the sources the people -- according to one of the sources, the people include current and former jpmorgan employees as you would expect. now, reports of this probe first -@surfaced in the fall. now we can report that investigat
it to some of the other developed economies, you can see how well australia is holding up. we've seen growth of just 2.5% in the u.s., 1.5% in canada and zero growth in the uk. locally, cutbacks in government spending weighed on the numbers and lower commodity prices also impacted on cash flow and the government is facing more criticism about its effort to keep the budget in surplus while the economy grows. >> the government has had the objective of making sure that we would bring our budget back to surplus when growth has been around trend. what we've been seeking to do through good budget policy has been to provide maximum flexibility to the reserve bank to a just rate so. the government will always put in place appropriate budget settings which will support growth and jobs. >> still, analysts say growth could slow further as the mining investment boom peaks. yesterday, the bank of australia cut interest rates to a record low of 3% and traders are looking further easing next year to offset the falling talks of trade, the high australian daughter and further cutbacks in government spending.
to protect the top 2%. better to take the hit now, they argued, than in january with the world economy in turmoil and second recession coming. number two, john boehner, the speaker is claiming he's met obama's demand for higher taxes for the rich. that's good. he agreed in principle the rich must pay more. number three, there's talk for the republican leaders that they could vote to continue the tax cuts for the 98% now and therefore avoid the fiscal cliff and put off for now the top 2%. and the question then, let the debt ceiling not take effect. a tax cut delayed i argue is a tax cut avoided. joining me with the republican defense highly tauted fan of the eagles, ed rendell and alex wagner of msnbc's "now." governor, i want you to read what's going on here. first speaker boehner defended the gop's tax proposal saying it does take a bite out of the rich but president obama held firm to tax rate hike on the wealthiest. let's listen to the back and forth. >> revenues we're putting on the table are going to come from, guess who? the rich. there are ways to limit deductions, close loophol
to work on what we all agree to, which is let's keep middle-class taxes low. that's what our economy needs. that's what the american people deserve. >> white house also turning to social media has a twitter hash tag to spread its message. >> today i'm asking congress to listen to the people who sent us here to serve. i'm asking americans all across the country to make your voice heard. tell members of congress what a $2,000 tax hike would mean to you. call your members of congress. write them an e-mail, post it on their facebook walls. you can tweet it using the hash tag #my2k. not y2k, my2k. >> i think that's going to push us into the promised land. >> i was incredibly encouraged. i had been depressed and then i said this could actually get done with a hash tag. >> you're very pessimistic. we heard erskine bowles saying yesterday, he thinks it's less than a one in three chance, of course, co-author of the simpson-bowles plan. >> i was in washington earlier this week and met with a lot of these characters. the bottom line is there have been a lot of meetings, most of them between people w
put it in perspective say it going to be a tough economy for the next decade is there anything this there fiscal cliff negotiations that there would be a package for jobs or helping the economy over the next couple of years in the near term? >> well, one would hope so my own belief is there should be significant investment in roads, bridges, airports, schools, other infrastructure for this country because we not only have a fiscal deficit we also have an infrastructure deficit. that would give two advantages. one, it would employ people in this country at a time when unemployment is too high. and numb two it uld improve the competive position of the country so, that's a to-for. >> susie: senator conrad, thank you for coming to the program. we appreciate it. >> thank you, always good to be with you. >> reporter: i'm erika miller in new york. still ahead, we'll look at why silver has been one of the best performing asset classes this year. >> tom: the u.s. economy was hotter than first thought this summer. in the newest data on the gross domestic product, the economy grew in the
the divisions in washington are may be so large we will harm our economy and harm our problem as they fail to solve problems and work these things out. over the past year, we have been joined by 300,000 saturdays, 100 of the leading ceoas, and small businesses who have said we need fix the debt, that we know. but we wanted to create a different kind of campaign where we come to washington, and while you have so many folks on side saying, "don't touch this. don't touch this. take this off the table." suddenly you're left with nothing on the table to fick the problem. we wanted to create a broad-based bipartisan group to work with members of congress to come up way deal. over the past week, we met with over 50 members of congress. we had very productive meetings with both the white house and the republican leadership basically saying we know we need a plan that will be big enough to fix the problem and biexprs balanced, and we want to help you come to that-- >> schieffer: let me just talk to you, mark zandi. you're our economic forecasters. ent to just go back to the beginning to try to help
enviable numbers out of china. chinese government economists there say they do expect their economy will grow this year by less than 8%, though. it would be the first time in 13 years that it's dropped below that mark. the government targeted growth of 7.5%. a representative of the chinese academy of social sciences said the economy would grow 7.7%. >> translator: china's exports are slowing because of the european debt crisis and the global economic slowdown. >> he said the economy bottomed out in the july-to-september quarter, but consumption as well as industrial output improved in september and october. he's predicting growth will rebound next year to about 8.2%. he said increased public investment and more monetary easing would spur the economy. but li called for flexible government policies if the situation in europe gets any worse. >>> a report sponsored by the u.s. government says that shipping surplus shale gas overseas will benefit the country's economy. this could pave the way for getting government permission to export the commodity. the u.s. energy department released t
for regional power. israel has the most powerful economy and military, but lacks political power for obvious reasons. turkey has economic and military power, but it also has growing regional clout. egypt is the natural leader of the arab world but it's not in a position to dominate. its economy is shambles, its military is second rate. the public opposition has been reassuring. the middle east is a complex region that is changing fast. grand generalizations about it are likely to be undone by events. but it is a more vibrant, energetic, open, even democratic place than the middle east a generation ago. for more, read my column in this week's "time" magazine. let's get started. >>> it was a week filled with tension and violence in egypt. there were mass protests after morsi issued a decree neutering the judiciary. there were demonstrations in his favor, and a constitution was drafted that spurred protest on the street. what to make of it all? two of my favorite scholars are with me. welcome, guys. conventional wisdom is this is a power grab by morsi. is that accurate? >> his dclaration gave h
-- never rise above it, what does that say about our country? to me, it says our economy is failing to provide the basic security, much less rising wages. our schools are failing to provide a path out of poverty our families and communities are breaking down -- out of poverty. our families and communities are breaking down. our homes and neighborhoods. at a time of great consequence, the american people have chosen a divided government. it is up to us to make this divided government work. we have to set aside partisan concerns. how to work together to prepare this economy to get people back on their feet? how do we get this sense of real security and upper mobility for all americans, especially those in need? they are the same. the old ways will not do. we need new thinking and renewed efforts from all americans. it is true that president obama won reelection. i congratulate him on his victory. on january 20, he will face a a fiscal economy and and i mess. you might say he will inherit these problems. [laughter] [applause] he his second term, i hope t will offer fresh ideas. failure
to make the economy move forward. i don't think any politician wants to have on their watch to see this economy going into another recession and to avert that from happening both sides have to come together and reach a deal. markets trying to price and -- is ot impossible to sell off if we continue to see this uncertainty, if we had those key technical levels it is a buying opportunity for big investors and the public as well. dave: i was talking to a trader in london earlier today, he was saying europe has tried, france and england and spain raised taxes and this is not created any economic growth. some people looking at china, despite the talk about how china's economy is slowing down, there may be interesting places to put your money over there. do you agree? >> i completely agree but don't think that is directly in china but there are some great u.s. companies that make revenues to the rest of the world and -- proctor and gamble, all of our tobacco companies, we have brands like starbucks, the rest of the world aspires to end huge middle-class being created all over the world
strategy? what do you want to do with your money in the economy does go off the fiscal cliff? >> yeah, we were worried about that back in september, october. so even though we like the equity markets going into 2013, we wanted to hedge ourselves a little bit, so we took money out of equities. didn't just put it into cash. we put it into three areas we think are still good long term. one is we talk about emerging market equities, but i like emerging market debt. these monetary authorities are done tightening. they fought the inflationary problem that they had successfully. they're in hoed. yield curves could shift down. we stress doing it in local currency. the other areas are u.s. high yield, which i still think is valuable. we do think spreads will contract and emerging market equities as well. >> jordan, what about you? how are you preparing for what could be an eventuality where we go over the cliff and we've got to deal with higher taxes and a slower economy? a lot of people expecting recession in 2013, if, in fact, this occurs. >> think about what works well in a slow-growth economy.
over the last four years, there is progress in some key sectors of our economy. we've seen housing finally begin to bounce back for the first time, and that obviously has an enormous ripple affect throughout the economy. consumer confidence is as high as it's been. many of you over the last two, three years have experienced record profits or near record profits and have a lot of money where you're prepared to invest in plants, and equipment, and hire folks. obviously globally the economy is still soft. europe is going to be in the doldrums for quite some time. asia is not charging forward and some of the emerging markets are not charging forward as quickly as they were maybe a few years ago. but i think what all of you recognize and many of you have told me is that everybody is looking to america, because they understand that if we're able to put forward a long-term agenda for growth and prosperity that is broad based here in the united states, that confidence will not just increase here in the united states, it will increase globe balance leave. globally and i think we can get the
. stuart: you agree with me, if this plan, anything like it from the president, were imposed on the economy at this time it would lead to recession. >> i think that the president is fully aware as are democrats and anybody realistic. stuart: you make that judgment. >> i am not a fan, by the way, never have been, i thought the fiscal cliff thing was ridiculous in the beginning. no, no, but prefacing my answer to you. stuart: higher taxes of this magnitude on an economy that's already weak with 8% unemployment, you do that and now it's not-- >> no, no, no, i do not believe that raising the marginal tax rates to the clinton rates for the wealthiest among us-- >> i knew you were going to say that, you're comparing a totally different economy. what we have now is 8% unemployment. very sluggish growth and a trillion dollar deficit every year. you propose to raise taxes in that environment and you're not going to get growth. >> don't you understand you need to off set-- if you're serious about debt reduction, i think you are, don't you understand you need revenue and spending cuts. stuart: and how
market. it is just going to affect the economy the same as gas prices or food prices going up on the poor and middle class. life will go on. just like life has gone on for the rest of the united states of america. but right now, i think the state of politics is very sad because they're seen -- there seems to be more of a game to be played and positions, one party having the upper hand over the other. not much is going to get done. and you have too many extremes on each side to make things a lot more difficult to run. and it makes it difficult on the president as well. i'm optimistic that the president got reelected, but pessimistic on anything really changing. have leased, anytime soon. -- at least, any time soon. host: and talking about actual change, if there will be a difference on january 1st or otherwise, in terms of taxes, politics, the fiscal cliff, john mckinnon, are any of these expiring? as part of our fiscal cliff series, we're looking at the bush tax cuts that are set to expire unless congress acts, and we are looking at spending cuts. our deductions on the chopping block unle
is going to take a more, i would say rational approach to how to deal with their own economy and how they deal with their own people, and how they deal internationally. and so i think generally there's been a feeling that there might be some hope there. however, now we are approaching, once again, a potential violation of a u.n. security council resolution, and we encourage the leadership in north korea to consider what they are doing here and implications in the overall security environment on the korean peninsula, as well as destination. >> anything new? we been hearing some rumblings for some time that there might be some activity on that front. anything new that you can provide in terms of insights into launches or things like that? >> well, i think you're tracking a pretty well. i think from the media today there are indications declared indications of their intention to do what they would call a peaceful satellite launch. and we believe it is in contradictory to the u.n. security council resolutions, that because of the nature of the type of missile they will be firing and the
forward, helping us revive this economy. we don't want to set them back. and so why not do what the senate did several months ago in passing a bill bipartisanly that protects the middle class from seeing their taxes raised? we only need a few dozen republicans, quite honestly, to get that done because we're about to sign a discharge petition that we are going to declare as democrats that we are ready to plass the middle class tax protection act which will make sure that middle-class families do not watch their taxes go up simply because republicans are intent on protecting millionaires and billionaires and are holding middle-class families hostage to that increasing tax. we believe we can end december, certainly before the holidays on a really good note, maybe still having some disagreement but at least let's agree that we're not going to let the american people watch congress play this game of chicken right before the holidays where the american people are the hostages when we know that we have bipartisan agreement on protecting the middle class. and so we are thrilled that mr. walz has t
of our fragile economy hangs in the fiscal cliff balance, for that let's turn to our distinguished guests. peter goodman. he's the huffington post business editor on a former "new york times"man. we welcome back republican congresswoman nan hayworth and haddy heath, senior policy analyst with the independent women's forum. okay. so mcconnell laughed at the tim geithner proposal. and john boehner says we're at a stalemate. and president obama himself is kind of getting ugly about this enemy's list. we've seen this before from him. my proposal is, republicans have to come with a counter offer. right now. there's no point in blasting obama. just a counter offer. i want to read from today's newspaper. this is what mitch mcconnell said. "higher medicare premiums for the wealthy, an increase in the medicare eligibility age, and a slowing of costs of living increases for programs like social security. and then republicans would agree to include more tax revenue in the deal but not from higher tax rates." now, let's just look at this for a second. we'll go to you first, nan. he wants medicare eli
for the american economy and says all the wrong signals to us signals to the market and international investors. also the demonstration of the sheer breathtaking arrogance of the obama presidency. this is a set of demands from an imperial white house. that simply is not open to any form of discussion at all according to these latest developments. this is a deeply worrying. the united states is on the edge of the economic abyss. the $16 trillion debt. so far there are no serious proposals whatsoever coming from the obama administration with regard to cutting this level of debt that the united states knows. america is heading for an economic catastrophe. it is a slow-moving sort of trained crash. gerri: i think that train is being of every single day. to you. imperial presidency. not only imperial. it's on hiatus. the talks have been outsourced. the very man who negotiated the biggest bailout of banks in u.s. history. i think his choice of a negotiator is even problematic at this point. >> i completely agree. if you think back to the start of the first administration, he had his problems getting
on the economy. tom just talked about that weak data showing businesses contracting. and we're also getting warnings on weak corporate profits. so doesn't this give you pause about buying in this market right now? >> i think, i just got back from two weeks in europe speaking to portfolio managers in seven different countries. they are profoundly underinvestmented in the u.s. the endowment funds in this country are profoundly underinvested in u.s. equities. a lot of portfolio managers are hoping equities go down as measured by the s&p so their underperformance doesn't look as bad. if the market doesn't go down here i think they will be forced to chase not end of the year. >> susie: uh-huh. beyond stocks, give us your thoughts on bonds, on gold, and other commodities. >> i think gold is in a secular bull market. i think it's just been consolidating the big run it has had and will eventually go higher. bons i think with the re-election of president obama it pretty much insurances you will have low-interest rates for the next 18 to 24 months at least on the shored end of the yield curve. but i
. >>> chinese government economists say they expect their economy will grow this year by less than 8%. it would be the first time in 13 years it's dropped below that mark. the government targeted growth of 7.5%. a representative of the chinese academy of social sciences said the economy will grow 7.7%. >> translator: china's exports are slowing because of the european debt crisis and the global economic slow down. >> li said economy bottomed out in the july through september quarter. the country's consumption and industrial output improved in september and october. he predicts growth will rebound next year to about 8.2%. he said increased public investment and more monetary easing would spur the economy. but li called for flexible government policies if the situation in europe gets worse. >>> the new leader of the chooeds communist party is sending out mixed signals. xi jinping says he wants to pursue a peaceful foreign policy. at the same time, china is locked in territorial disputes with japan and several southeast asian nations over islands in the east and south china seas. xi told a group o
savings as part of that and invest in things that matter to the american economy. we think we can do that. we have a good chance to do it now. it's important that we do it. i think we're going to get there. >> given tough talk over the weekend, why aren't we waking up to down numbers, red arrows? >> europe is terrific. bond rates are phenomenal. a great run. china numbers are better. i think that there's a lot of people who feel like doug cast does who writes with me with a piece in "the new york times" saying that -- >> most stuff is nontaxable accounts any way. most stocks that people won't be as motivated to sell as people think. of course that doesn't necessarily deal with the increase in payroll taxes and the whole recession side of it. it does deal with the stock market side in terms of selling. >> why not say, listen, fiscal cliff, i have to cut numbers. i have to cut guidance. i think many ceos will cut guidance because of the possibility that the amt is going to -- this alternative minimum tax, people don't know they have to write a check for $3,500 at the end of the year. once y
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